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Choosing An IQ Test For Your Child

2014-03-12 12:21:28 +0530

While there are a dozen IQ tests available online, here are 5 main tests that are widely accepted across the world

Depending on their age group and also the skill you are most interested in assessing, you can decide which test suits your child best from the following list: 

1. Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Third Edition (WPPSI-III)
The Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Third Edition (WPPSI-III) has 2 versions. The first version is used for children aged between 2.5 and 3 years. The next version of the test is meant for children aged between 4 and 7 years. The test mainly focuses on measuring verbal performance, and also processing speed abilities, which are done through sub-tests like, symbol search, picture naming and non-fluid reasoning.

2. KABC-II: Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition
The KABC-II: Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition, is used for children right from 3 years up to 18 years of age. The unique thing about this particular test is that it is designed to expect minimal verbal responses, thus eliminating language or cultural barriers; and also designed for children with learning challenges. Conceptual thinking, face recognition, word order and hand movements are some of the areas tested by KABC-II. Psychologists often use results from this test along with other tests to create education plans for children with special needs, and also assess neurological disorders of children.

3. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC)
The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) is currently in its fourth revision, so the test is sometimes also known as the WISC-IV. The WISC is designed for children aged between 6 and 16 years. The WISC uses 16 sub-tests, including Visual Digit Span (VDS), Coding Recall (CDR) and Information Multiple Choice (INMC), to measure ability in 5 key areas-verbal comprehension, perceptual (non-verbal) reasoning, processing speed, memory and executive function-and is theorised to control the function of other abilities.

4. Stanford-Binet Scale
The Stanford-Binet IQ test is perhaps one of the oldest and most recognised tests across the world. This test is designed to assess intelligence and cognitive abilities of children from 2 years to young adults aged 23 years. The test assesses skills across 4 areas, namely, vocabulary, number series, memory for sentences, equation building and pattern analysis. This is done through 15 sub-tests to arrive at a standard age score, which is essentially an average of the scores across various skill areas. This score is used by psychologists to compare with the average score of other test takers of the same age. 

5. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III)
Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) is meant for adults between 18 and 80 years of age. The WAIS-III, while primarily meant to assess intelligence, is also meant to evaluate a tester's personality. The test measures verbal skills, symbol search, letter-number sequencing and matrix-reasoning (nonverbal and abstract problem solving) capabilities.




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Hemant Mehta/Thinkstock

Choosing An IQ Test For Your Child

2014-03-12 12:21:28 +0530

While there are a dozen IQ tests available online, here are 5 main tests that are widely accepted across the world

Depending on their age group and also the skill you are most interested in assessing, you can decide which test suits your child best from the following list: 

1. Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Third Edition (WPPSI-III)
The Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Third Edition (WPPSI-III) has 2 versions. The first version is used for children aged between 2.5 and 3 years. The next version of the test is meant for children aged between 4 and 7 years. The test mainly focuses on measuring verbal performance, and also processing speed abilities, which are done through sub-tests like, symbol search, picture naming and non-fluid reasoning.

2. KABC-II: Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition
The KABC-II: Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition, is used for children right from 3 years up to 18 years of age. The unique thing about this particular test is that it is designed to expect minimal verbal responses, thus eliminating language or cultural barriers; and also designed for children with learning challenges. Conceptual thinking, face recognition, word order and hand movements are some of the areas tested by KABC-II. Psychologists often use results from this test along with other tests to create education plans for children with special needs, and also assess neurological disorders of children.

3. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC)
The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) is currently in its fourth revision, so the test is sometimes also known as the WISC-IV. The WISC is designed for children aged between 6 and 16 years. The WISC uses 16 sub-tests, including Visual Digit Span (VDS), Coding Recall (CDR) and Information Multiple Choice (INMC), to measure ability in 5 key areas-verbal comprehension, perceptual (non-verbal) reasoning, processing speed, memory and executive function-and is theorised to control the function of other abilities.

4. Stanford-Binet Scale
The Stanford-Binet IQ test is perhaps one of the oldest and most recognised tests across the world. This test is designed to assess intelligence and cognitive abilities of children from 2 years to young adults aged 23 years. The test assesses skills across 4 areas, namely, vocabulary, number series, memory for sentences, equation building and pattern analysis. This is done through 15 sub-tests to arrive at a standard age score, which is essentially an average of the scores across various skill areas. This score is used by psychologists to compare with the average score of other test takers of the same age. 

5. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III)
Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) is meant for adults between 18 and 80 years of age. The WAIS-III, while primarily meant to assess intelligence, is also meant to evaluate a tester's personality. The test measures verbal skills, symbol search, letter-number sequencing and matrix-reasoning (nonverbal and abstract problem solving) capabilities.


Only registered members may add Reminder. Please register or login.
Only registered members may Bookmark. Please register or login.
Only registered members may Comment. Please register or login.
Only registered members may follow posts and authors. Please register or login.
Hemant Mehta/Thinkstock

Choosing An IQ Test For Your Child

2014-03-12 12:21:28 +0530

While there are a dozen IQ tests available online, here are 5 main tests that are widely accepted across the world

Depending on their age group and also the skill you are most interested in assessing, you can decide which test suits your child best from the following list: 

1. Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Third Edition (WPPSI-III)
The Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Third Edition (WPPSI-III) has 2 versions. The first version is used for children aged between 2.5 and 3 years. The next version of the test is meant for children aged between 4 and 7 years. The test mainly focuses on measuring verbal performance, and also processing speed abilities, which are done through sub-tests like, symbol search, picture naming and non-fluid reasoning.

2. KABC-II: Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition
The KABC-II: Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, Second Edition, is used for children right from 3 years up to 18 years of age. The unique thing about this particular test is that it is designed to expect minimal verbal responses, thus eliminating language or cultural barriers; and also designed for children with learning challenges. Conceptual thinking, face recognition, word order and hand movements are some of the areas tested by KABC-II. Psychologists often use results from this test along with other tests to create education plans for children with special needs, and also assess neurological disorders of children.

3. Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC)
The Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) is currently in its fourth revision, so the test is sometimes also known as the WISC-IV. The WISC is designed for children aged between 6 and 16 years. The WISC uses 16 sub-tests, including Visual Digit Span (VDS), Coding Recall (CDR) and Information Multiple Choice (INMC), to measure ability in 5 key areas-verbal comprehension, perceptual (non-verbal) reasoning, processing speed, memory and executive function-and is theorised to control the function of other abilities.

4. Stanford-Binet Scale
The Stanford-Binet IQ test is perhaps one of the oldest and most recognised tests across the world. This test is designed to assess intelligence and cognitive abilities of children from 2 years to young adults aged 23 years. The test assesses skills across 4 areas, namely, vocabulary, number series, memory for sentences, equation building and pattern analysis. This is done through 15 sub-tests to arrive at a standard age score, which is essentially an average of the scores across various skill areas. This score is used by psychologists to compare with the average score of other test takers of the same age. 

5. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III)
Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Third Edition (WAIS-III) is meant for adults between 18 and 80 years of age. The WAIS-III, while primarily meant to assess intelligence, is also meant to evaluate a tester's personality. The test measures verbal skills, symbol search, letter-number sequencing and matrix-reasoning (nonverbal and abstract problem solving) capabilities.